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Look again! Beer goggles are for real

Posted by Staffreporter  |  07. June 2010

Image Courtesy: Google
Image Courtesy: Google
For those of you unfamiliar with the
party scene, "beer goggles" refers to how people often appear more attractive after you've had a few drinks. For a long time, it was just used as an excuse to explain notorious side effects of alcohol but now a study has proved that beer goggles really do exist.

For the first time, scientists have proven that beer goggles are real and people really do look more attractive when you are drunk. A team of psychologists found 64 students of varying levels of drunkenness in bars at Roehampton University, London. They were asked to judge 20 photos of men and women aged 18 to 25. One face in each pair was digitally enhanced to make it more symmetrical — and therefore more attractive.

Also the study has found that drunk students were up to 10% more likely to fall for less attractive people than those who were sober. It showed the more they drank, the less likely they were to recognize finer details on people’s faces.

“This is the first time I’m hearing about beer goggles, but yes I’ve seen it happen. People always end up picking out the worst partners at the end of the party and I have always wondered why this happens. But now I know, beer goggles can be dangerous,” Says Deejay Jay.

“Oh, yes beer goggles is for real, I’ve had my share of bad experiences. But now I make sure I go out in groups so that I don’t get in trouble,” Says Vineeta Makhija, Graphic Designer.
According to the aforementioned study, what constitutes attractive changes drastically after a few drinks. In other words, while you may think you're hitting on a 10, there's a chance you're actually picking up someone in the lower-single digits.

The reasons behind this phenomenon have to do with alcohol stimulating the nucleus accumbens, aka "the part of the brain which is used to determine facial attractiveness." “Drunk students were less good at noticing symmetrical faces and cared less about the defects”, said Lewis Halsey, who led the study.

Source: IANS

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